Preschool could guide children through practical activities to feel ready for the primary school

Preschool could guide children through practical activities to feel ready for the primary school. They need to offer priming events where children make multiple visits with a group of friends who will be attending the same school, to allow them to talk with children who are currently attending the primary school or to participate in an activity. Thus an immersion programme is organised by the primary schools which include classroom activities, art, music, touring the school facilities and learning to navigate the school (Ministry of Education, 2013).
As a preschool teacher, the teacher could set up a dramatic centre where the child can take on an active role, which can help the child to practise self-help skills such as paying on their own, learn to queue and most importantly, to articulate what they want (Lee & Goh, 2012). Thus, a preschool teacher could scaffold the child, which gradually withdrawn when the child has masters it.
Preschool teacher can collaborate and exchange information with the primary school teacher to help them to be more informed on children’s development and prior experiences. It is encouraged that class lists to be generated earlier to allow the primary school teacher to have time for personal visits to the child and their parents (Blaisdell, 2014). By having frequent visits, it allows the primary school to prepare the child for the new environment.
As a parent, they could share their own experience of school life and what they enjoyed, to their child. Parents may also encourage the child to talk about their feelings about changes that they will be facing and the concerns that they might have about going to primary school. These conversations can help the child to look forward to a new experience of schooling. The parents may also visit the primary school website to get the child interested in the activities and facilities they provided (Early Childhood Development Agency, 2016).
Preschool could support parents regarding their children’s school transition by offering multiple opportunities for parents to learn not only about the primary school but also what to expect during the transition period. There could be short-term interventions to support parents during school transition. These programmes involved guided play for children and parents in a group setting and activities for parents at home, which focus on both practical and child development issues. For instance, Ministry Of Education (MOE) had given parents and children entering primary one, an activity book which consists of tips and activities which encourage parent and child conversation and to help them to adjust to the routines that the child will practise in school (Yang, 2016). Furthermore, the primary school could make the school and classroom accessible to parents for informal visits within the first three days and have workshops.
In terms of curriculum, preschool teachers and parents could review the primary school curriculum together and discuss what are the skills the children will need when they enter primary one. Both teachers in primary school and preschool could teach using the same pedagogy to provide the continuity in terms of curriculum. This was a step Ministry Of Education (MOE) preschool did to ensure the smooth transition. They have the same ministry team that developed lower primary curriculum to design the curriculum for MOE kindergarten (TODAYonline, 2014).